Interagency Safeguarding Procedures Information for Parents and Carers Information for Children & Young People What to do if you're worried a child is being abused Bradford Safeguarding Children Board

Bradford Safeguarding Children Board > Documents

BSCB Constitution

The BSCB Statement of Intent

NEW - Annual Report 2015-16

NEW - CDOP Annual Report - 2015-16

Business Plan 2015-16

Performance Management Framework 2015

Learning and Improvement Framework - Revised April 2015

Common Referral Form: Bradford Children's Social Care

The Child Death Review: A Guide for Parents and Carers

The Safeguarding Report for Madaaris provides recommendations drawn from consultations with key organisations including the Council for Mosques, BSCB, NSPCC, West Yorkshire Police, Bradford City Centre Project and representatives from Masajid/Madaaris in Bradford and Keighley as well as parents and young people.
 


NEW -  Early Help Board Briefings

The Early Help Board has recognised there is a need for a common message about our current and future Early Help provision, as well as our Front Door arrangements in Bradford. Bradford Safeguarding Children Board has endorsed these developments and is assisting in the dissemination of these briefings.

In this context the Early Help Board has agreed a briefing for all partners working with children in Bradford which:

  • Summarises the current position on Early Help, including the large amount of early help that is currently provided
  • Recognises that there are assessment processes currently in place: CAF is our current default Early Help assessment tool
  • Describes the current referral routes
  • Outlines how and why the Early Help model is being developed and what will change.

The Early Help Board is keen that this consistent message and understanding is shared across all partners and is used in relevant circumstances.

I would ask you for your support in making sure that these briefings are circulated widely to all relevant staff, put on staff notice boards where appropriate. We will be providing further briefings to update staff on Early Help progress including a write up of the Pathfinders in Keighley and BD4/5.

Early Help Update - May 2016

Bradford Front Door Briefing - May 2016


Procedure for Dealing with Dogs

Guidance for Professionals

We will be adding details of training and a risk assessment shortly.


Bradford Single Child Assessment

Bradford Single Child Assessment (BCSA) is Bradford’s new statutory assessment for children in need, children subject to child safeguarding concerns and children who become looked after. It came into use for new assessments commenced during May 2014 and it replaces the initial and core assessment arrangements. However the BCSA does not replace the Common Assessment (CAF).

The Bradford Single Child Assessment (BSCA) is led and managed by social workers from Children’s Social Care at Bradford Council who will collaborate with the family, child and relevant professionals to gather information.

The BSCA has been considered and endorsed by the Pro-Active and Responsive sub group of Bradford Safeguarding Children Board (BSCB), and by the full Board at its meeting on 19th March 2014. The BSCA is an important development which is evidence of the commitment of BSCB and its partners to develop child-focused, transparent arrangements for all assessments.

Guidance for professionals who may contribute to BSCA has been produced and can be downloaded here.


 


NEW - 5 new Government publications regarding Safeguarding Children

During March 2015 the government issued five new or updated documents each of which is significant for organisations and individual professionals working with children and families:

  1. Working Together to Safeguarding Children - see more

  2. Keeping Children Safe in Education (2015) - see more

  3. Keeping Children Safe in Education: information for all school and college staff - see more

  4. What to do if you are worried a child is being abused? - see more

  5. Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers - see more

.............................................................

1. Working Together to Safeguarding Children  Download here

This is an updated and revised version of the previous guidance from 2013. Many of the revisions have been made to incorporate legislation or statutory guidance that has been set out over the last couple of years. This revised document also makes it clear that safeguarding and child protection guidance applies to all schools and colleges whatever their status or constitution.

Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015 is the key document that sets outs what local authorities should do. This also includes “adult services, the police, academy trusts, education, youth justice services and the voluntary and community sector who have contact with children and families”.

The guidance reminds all professionals that come into contact with children and young people of these two principles:

Key principles

Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility: for services to be effective each professional and organisation should play their full part; and

A child-centred approach: for services to be effective they should be based on a clear understanding of the needs and views of children.

Changes in Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015:

LSCBs must commission services for children who have been or may be:

  • sexually exploited

  • subject to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

  • radicalised

Local authorities must establish Channel panels to assess the extent to which identified individuals are vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism and arrange for support to be provided to them. Education is a panel partner.

Young carer’s assessments must reach a view on whether any care tasks are “inappropriate” or “excessive.”

Organisations need clear whistleblowing procedures in line with Sir Robert Francis’s Freedom to Speak Up report

Previously local authorities must have in place a ‘Local Authority Designated Officer’ (LADO) to handle all allegations against adults who work with children and young people. Although this practice must continue, Working Together to safeguard Children 2015′ no longer refers to them as LADOs only ‘designated officers’ or teams. People undertaking this must now be qualified social workers (apart from people currently in post or moving between authorities).

Other changes include notifiable incidents involving the care of a child, the definition of serious harm for the purposes of serious case reviews and child death reviews.

.............................................................


2.  Keeping Children Safe in Education (2015) Download here

This document is a revised version of the previous document of the same name. The body of the document is largely unchanged, but there are new inclusions that draw in new guidance or legislation since the original was published, including disqualification by association (Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009) and duties under the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015. The new version of ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education 2015′ also refers to two other updated documents ‘What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused 2015′ and ‘Information Sharing 2015′. It is noted that ‘Working together to Safeguard Children’ has also been updated.

‘Keeping children safe in education 2015′ is statutory guidance and all schools and colleges must have regard to it. whatever their status. Schools includes:

  • maintained nursery schools

  • maintained, non-maintained or independent schools

  • academies and free schools

  • alternative provision academies and

  • pupil referral units.

Colleges includes further education colleges and sixth-form colleges (for students under the age of 18), but excludes 16-19 academies and free schools (which are required to comply with relevant safeguarding legislation by virtue of their funding agreement).

Policies

‘Keeping children safe in education 2015′ emphasises that safeguarding policies should include:

  • staff relationships with pupils

  • reference to the ‘Position of Trust’ offence (Sexual Offences Act 2003)

  • communications on social media

  • information sharing

Allegations of abuse made against teachers and other staff

In the previous edition, where staff had concerns about another adult in school, it could be reported to the headteacher or Designated Safeguarding Lead. In this edition, reports must be made only to the headteacher.

Each local authority must make arrangements for the management of allegations of abuse by staff. In the past the person responsible for those allegations has been called the Local authority Designated Officer (LADO). ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015′ has slightly changed this role to allow LAs to develop teams, integrate the work in other child protection work and, apart from current post-holders, the staff carrying out this work must now be qualified social workers.

After any allegations of abuse have been made, there are a range of specified outcomes:

  • substantiated

  • malicious

  • false and

  • unsubstantiated.

‘Keeping Children Safe in education 2015′ has introduced a further outcome ‘unfounded':

Schools may wish to use the additional definition of ‘unfounded’ to reflect cases where there is no evidence or proper basis which supports the allegation being made. It might also indicate that the person making the allegation misinterpreted the incident or was mistaken about what they saw. Alternatively they may not have been aware of all the circumstances.

Vetting and Barring Checks

‘Keeping Children Safe in Education 2015′, paragraph 52 sets out the required checks:

For most appointments, an enhanced DBS certificate, which includes barred list information, will be required as the majority of staff will be engaging in regulated activity. In summary, a person will be considered to be engaging in regulated activity if as a result of their work they:

  • will be responsible, on a regular basis in a school or college, for teaching, training instructing, caring for or supervising children;

  • or will carry out paid, or unsupervised unpaid, work regularly in a school or college where that work provides an opportunity for contact with children;

  • engage in intimate or personal care or overnight activity, even if this happens only once.

Checks on Volunteers

Although many schools and authorities have been doing this for sometime, the expectation of vetting checks for volunteers has been clarified: volunteers may have Enhanced checks, but not barred list checks.

Paragraph 53 says that for staff who have an “opportunity for regular contact with children who are not engaging in regulated activity, an enhanced DBS certificate, which does not include a barred list check, will be appropriate.”

Paragraph 54 says ‘In a school or college, a supervised volunteer who regularly teaches or looks after children is not in regulated activity.’

DBS Update Service

Joining the DBS Update service allows for vetting checks to have ‘portability’, that is say be taken from one employer to another, as long as the person has registered with the update service at the point the check was received or within 19 days of receiving it.

The revised ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education 2015′ says:

Before using the Update Service schools or colleges must

a. obtain consent from the applicant to do so;
b. confirm the certificate matches the individual’s identity; and
c. examine the original certificate to ensure that it is for the appropriate workforce and level of check, e.g. enhanced certificate/enhanced including barred list information.

Transfer of child protection files

CP files must by transferred ‘as soon as possible’, but now the following guidance is included: ‘ensuring secure transit and confirmation of receipt should be obtained.’

Individual staff may make a direct referral to social services

Whilst the previous version of Keeping Children safe in Education said that ‘anybody can make a referral’, the new guidance says, “In exceptional circumstances, such as in emergency or a genuine concern that appropriate action has not been taken, staff members can speak directly to children’s social care.“

.............................................................

3.  Keeping Children Safe in Education: information for all school and college staff. Download here

This is a shorter document which sets out for staff in schools and colleges key principles to be applied if there is a concern about a child or particular practices in schools or colleges. It provides hyper-links to sources of further information about specific safeguarding issues such as child sexual exploitation, bullying, trafficking and faith abuse.

.............................................................

4.
What to do if you are worried a child is being abused? Download here

This document replaces the publication of the same name that was first published in 2006. It is non-statutory guidance and is aimed at anyone whose work brings them into contact with children and families, including those who work in early years, social care, health, education (including schools), the police and adult services.

People working with children should be guided by these four principles:

  • children have a right to be safe and should be protected from all forms of abuse and neglect;

  • safeguarding children is everyone’s responsibility;

  • it is better to help children as early as possible, before issues escalate and become more damaging; and

  • children and families are best supported and protected when there is a co-ordinated response from all relevant agencies.

There are four main categories of abuse and neglect and, although there are definitions in Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015, this document sets out some of the warning signs. These signs have been rewritten and are intended to be clearer and easier to apply in practice than the descriptions included in the earlier version of the document.

.............................................................

5. Information sharing: Advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers. Download here

Many professionals are wary about sharing information and are concerned about breaching the Data Protection Action. This document is quite clear about sharing information and encourages practitioners to balance the risk of sharing with the risk of not sharing. It also contains a useful flow chart outlining when and how to share information.

Everyone working with children must know the signs and symptoms of abuse and understand under what circumstances they are allowed to share information. Lord Laming emphasised that the safety and welfare of children is of paramount importance and highlighted the importance of practitioners feeling confident about when and how information can be legally shared.

Seven golden rules to sharing information

1. Remember that the Data Protection Act 1998 and human rights law are not barriers to justified information sharing, but provide a framework to ensure that personal information about living individuals is shared appropriately.

2. Be open and honest with the individual (and/or their family where appropriate) from the outset about why, what, how and with whom information will, or could be shared, and seek their agreement, unless it is unsafe or inappropriate to do so.

3. Seek advice from other practitioners if you are in any doubt about sharing the information concerned, without disclosing the identity of the individual where possible.

4. Share with informed consent where appropriate and, where possible, respect the wishes of those who do not consent to share confidential information. You may still share information without consent if, in your judgement, there is good reason to do so, such as where safety may be at risk. You will need to base your judgement on the facts of the case. When you are sharing or requesting personal information from someone, be certain of the basis upon which you are doing so. Where you have consent, be mindful that an individual might not expect information to be shared.

5. Consider safety and well-being: Base your information sharing decisions on considerations of the safety and well-being of the individual and others who may be affected by their actions.

6. Necessary, proportionate, relevant, adequate, accurate, timely and secure: Ensure that the information you share is necessary for the purpose for which you are sharing it, is shared only with those individuals who need to have it, is accurate and up-to-date, is shared in a timely fashion, and is shared securely (see principles).

7. Keep a record of your decision and the reasons for it – whether it is to share information or not. If you decide to share, then record what you have shared, with whom and for what purpose.
 


Procedure for Dealing with Dogs

Guidance for Professionals

We will be adding details of training and a risk assessment shortly.


Bradford Single Child Assessment

Bradford Single Child Assessment (BCSA) is Bradford’s new statutory assessment for children in need, children subject to child safeguarding concerns and children who become looked after. It came into use for new assessments commenced during May 2014 and it replaces the initial and core assessment arrangements. However the BCSA does not replace the Common Assessment (CAF).

The Bradford Single Child Assessment (BSCA) is led and managed by social workers from Children’s Social Care at Bradford Council who will collaborate with the family, child and relevant professionals to gather information.

The BSCA has been considered and endorsed by the Pro-Active and Responsive sub group of Bradford Safeguarding Children Board (BSCB), and by the full Board at its meeting on 19th March 2014. The BSCA is an important development which is evidence of the commitment of BSCB and its partners to develop child-focused, transparent arrangements for all assessments.

Guidance for professionals who may contribute to BSCA has been produced and can be downloaded here.

 


BCSB BDCT Joint Protocol
This joint protocol aims to promote effective joint working between staff from Bradford Children’s Social Care Services and the Bradford District Care Trust.  It promotes a “Think Family” approach when planning services to families in contact with both agencies. It sets out joint working expectations in assessments and interventions.

The protocol was developed following a joint audit by staff from both agencies of the work undertaken with vulnerable families. It is also a practical application of some of the lessons learned by all BSCB agencies when undertaking the Child J Serious Case Review.

"Safeguarding Children Information for Health & Social Care Workers"
Produced by Bradford District Care Trust

"Model Child Protection Policy for Supplementary Schools or Places of Worship"
This Word document was launched by Education Bradford, supported by BSCB, on 2nd February 2006.  Education Bradford will be providing electronic versions of this document in other languages, which we will placing on our website as soon as they are available.

Threshold of Need - Published June 2010
This is a guide for people who work with or are involved with children, young people and their families. Its aim is to assist practitioners and managers in assessing and identifying a child’s level of need, parent/carer factors, what type of services/resources may meet those needs and what processes to follow in moving from an assessment to a provision of services.

Audit of SRE and Sexual Health Provision Report (Full version)
Audit of Sex and Relationships Education and sexual health provision for disabled children and young people commissioned and carried out for Bradford Safeguarding Children Board, 2009-10 by Yolande Armstrong, ReFocus Training and Consultancy - click here for a summary version

 


Strategy Documents

The Bradford Safeguarding Children Board have produced a series of strategy and planning documents for accident prevention and training.  Click on the images to download a PDF version.  Printed copies are available from BSCB.

Learning and Development Strategy Training and Delivery Plan for 2011 - 2014

The BSCB has produced its new Learning and Development Strategy Training and Delivery Plan for 2011 - 2014.  This strategy provides the framework for safeguarding learning , development and training in Bradford District so that those working with children and families are appropriately skilled and trained.

It is a key document to help managers, practitioners and those with responsibility for staff development understand the guidance , standards and structures within which safeguarding training is provided and evaluated.

Download the PDF version here


 

Briefing Documents

The Bradford Safeguarding Children Board have produced a series of detailed briefing documents to help parents/carers and professionals understand the key elements of the child protection process.  These are available as PDFs below:

Medical Confidentiality

Signs and Symptoms of Child Abuse

Child Protection Investigations – A brief guide

About Your Child's Case Conference


Documents from other sources

Munro Review of Child Protection Services
Prof Eileen Munro today (10 May 2011) published the third and final part of her review of child protection services.  All three reports can be downloaded from here:

www.education.gov.uk/munroreview

The first one is "Part 1: A systems analysis"

The second is: "Interim Report: A child's journey"

The third is: "Final report: a child-centred system"

"The Third Joint Chief Inspectors' Report on Arrangements to Safeguard Children (2008)". This influential review of arrangements to safeguard children was led by Ofsted on behalf of the eight inspectorates involved in regulating and inspecting services for children and young people.

"Exemplars of Local Safeguarding Children Board Effective Practice". This contains 21 case studies from LSCB across England. Each case study shows how a LSCB has addressed a challenging issue of governance or practice.

SCR Biennial Overview Reports

Improving safeguarding practice - Study of serious case reviews 2001-2003

Analysing child deaths and serious injury through abuse and neglect: what can we learn?
A biennial analysis of serious case reviews 2003-2005

Abuse linked to spirit possession
The DfES has produced guidance for professionals working with families where there is concern about abuse linked to spirit possession. Click here to view. The guidance sets out:

  • Definitions and incidence
  • Key issues to be considered
  • How to identify such abuse and how professionals should respond.

As with other concerns about abuse, staff who have a concern that a child may be at risk from this form of abuse should consult with the Child Protection Unit - 01274 434343

NSPCC Oral Injuries - A leaflet about oral injuries and human bites in relation to child abuse that summarises what is currently known about oral injuries and human bites in relation to child abuse. The information will be of particular interest to dentists, dental care professionals, paediatricians, and Accident and Emergency (A&E) staff.

It will also be relevant to nursery nurses, health visitors, school nurses, teachers, legal practitioners, social workers and the police.  Other documents from this source.


Click here to see archive documents